State of the Blogosphere: A summary

Here are some high-points from Dave Sifry’s February State of the Blogospher report, based on analysis of Technorati’s search statistics 75,000 new weblogs are appearing every day 13.7 million bloggers are still posting 3 months after they started their weblog 2.7 million bloggers update their blogs at least weekly…. Watch what they do, what they post about, and what they link to as input to a new kind of display – a piece of media that showed you the most interesting posts and conversations that related to a topic area, like food, or technology, or politics, or PR.

TechnoratiHere are some high-points from Dave Sifry’s February State of the Blogosphere report, based on analysis of Technorati’s search statistics:

  • 75,000 new weblogs are starting every day
  • 13.7 million bloggers are still posting 3 months after they start their weblog
  • 2.7 million bloggers update their blogs at least weekly.
  • The blogosphere is 60 times larger than it was 3 years ago.

In the second part of Sifry’s State of the Blogsphere (Part II), he describes a new feature called Explore.

Why not use these authoritative bloggers as a new kind of editorial board? Watch what they do, what they post about, and what they link to as input to a new kind of display – a piece of media that showed you the most interesting posts and conversations that related to a topic area, like food, or technology, or politics, or PR. The idea is to use the bloggers that know the most about an area or topic to help spot the interesting trends that may never hit the “A-list”.

The list of topics comprise 65 items, from Advertising to Wine. Conspicuously missing (in my opinion) is education. I’ve noticed this in a number of technology and new media conversation communities. There is a lot of talk about the technology and the exciting potential impact on society, but no one seems interested in talking about what it means to education.

To be fair, I hacked the URL for the Technorati Explore feature to force education, and it came up. However, most of the posts dealt with immigration, religion in school, and Hillary Clinton. If we can break through the labels th

at are pasted across the school buildings of our minds, and actually see the classrooms that this new information environment enables, then I think it’s all people would want to talk about. It’s probably my own narrow point of view, but a compelling story about teaching and learning is needed — now.

Author: David Warlick

David Warlick has been an educator for the past 40+ years. He continues to do some writing, but is mostly seeking his next intersect between play, passion and purpose, dabbling in photography, drone videography and music production.