100 Years of Automotive Evolution

This infographic compares two vehicles, one made over 100 years ago, and one being made this year. It shares basic information about each, to show how far we have come. It shares that we now have safety features, entertainment features, and features beyond having to walk everywhere. This infographic, found on visual.ly, does a great […]

This infographic compares two vehicles, one made over 100 years ago, and one being made this year. It shares basic information about each, to show how far we have come. It shares that we now have safety features, entertainment features, and features beyond having to walk everywhere.

This infographic, found on visual.ly, does a great job of explaining simple information in a visually stimulating, and organized way. It uses a road to separate subjects, and gives headers for every section. It would be a great example to show your students how to make a simple infographic.

It would also be a great introduction into technology involving engines. How was the first engine created? What advances had to occur in order for it to be successful? Who else was working on an engine for a car, and what were their ideas? Dozens of people were working on this technology, trying to be the first and the best. It wasn’t just a single person who had an accident in a lab and invented the vehicle. Continue to track other innovations that led to today’s engine, and engines of the future. This will allow students to create a more simple knowledge base to build on.

Blog: http://visual.ly/100-years-automotive-evolution

When Dogs go Beyond Pets

About 50 years ago, a dog was named spot or fido, slept outside in a dog house, ate scraps, and ran around a fenced in backyard. Now they have names like Zoe (my dogs name), live inside, go on errands with us, eat special diets, and go to daycare. How did this change? Dogs do […]

About 50 years ago, a dog was named spot or fido, slept outside in a dog house, ate scraps, and ran around a fenced in backyard. Now they have names like Zoe (my dogs name), live inside, go on errands with us, eat special diets, and go to daycare. How did this change?

Dogs do a lot more than just keep us company. According to this infographic, found on GOOD.is, owning a dog lowers blood pressure and increases happiness. They also increase the likelihood that a child will participate in sports. They even have jobs. They assist people with disabilities, they become a good set of ears to a child struggling to read, and they even save lives. Dogs have become a very important part of our daily lives.

How have your students lives been affected by a pet? How many of your students live in a home with a pet? What are their favorite activities with their pets? Have the pets helped them to become more active? How are the pets like a sibling? Do their parents dress their pet up, give them gifts, or have them on special medicines? Have a fun conversation about dogs and share some stories about the important part dogs have played in rescuing people, finding bombs, and giving someone a normal life.

Blog: http://goo.gl/NkRhw

Youth Movement

The world may never have been so mobile, and the shifting demographics will certainly affect the future of various parts of the world. So where are the young moving and how much skill and knowledge (education) are they carrying with them? This collaboration between GOOD and Column Five Media seeks to answer these questions.

From the blog entry:

From 2007 to 2010, Gallup posed this evocative question to people in 148 countries all over the world. To include an additional dimension, the responses of young people aged 15 to 29, as well as educated adults, were also tracked. Together, the conceivable gain in overall population tell a tale of how the wishful relocation of young and educated people could shape what the world would resemble as desire becomes reality.

Instructional Ideas:

Learners might be asked to investigate countries, to which educated youth are moving, suggest, and support what they think might be the conditions and opportunities that draw them.

Data Source:

Gallup

Water is Essential to Everyday Life

It is one of the most plentiful and crucial substances on the planet, water. It’s also one of the substances that we take very much for granted and spend little time thinking about. This information video effectively shares many enlightening facts about our world of water.

From the Original Blog Entry:

Water is essential to everyday life. In a day, Europeans use about 50 gallons (189 liters) of water. American use 100 gallons (379 liters). Those living in sub-Saharan Africa use 2-5 gallons per day. More than 25% of bottled water comes from the same place as tap water; a municipal water supply. Drinking 8 glasses of water a day from water bottles will cost up to $1,400 over a year. Drinking from the tap will cost about $0.50 per year.

We also learn that it takes: 10 gallons to make a single slice of bread, 713 gallons to produce a cotton t-shirt, 1,000 gallons to make 1 gallon of milk, and 634 gallons to produce 1 burger.